Why Are All the News Items I Get Really Terrible?

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Why Are All the News Items I Get Really Terrible?

News is an unpublished account of public human activity, that seeks primarily to inform, interest, or entertain the readers about current events or happenings. It’s like a dessert coming out of the oven hot. Anything, that has come into print beforehand, doesn’t constitute news worthy to be published. The fourth most important pre-requisites for newsprint is that it ought to be well designed to impart some kind of vital information to its readers.

How can we gauge a news item as such? Well, firstly, the very nature of news item indicates that it will offer some basic information to readers – whether it be the latest happenings in some obscure location, the latest score at some match, or a report on some important event. Secondly, news items are meant to be read by people who are not deeply versed in the fields covered by the news item and news agencies. News is meant to be disseminated to as many people as possible, so that they may know about what is taking place.

A news item is not much use, if it is not read by anybody. But news is read and what is read is news. Readers don’t want to have to search out some obscure corner of a newspaper just to find out what’s happening in any city or town. Rather than waste time in merely flipping through a couple pages of news item, readers expect the news item to be highly compacted and easily understandable. Even the best news agencies often go for huge fonts and images – big enough to leave a lasting impression on their readers, but small enough to fit in their budget. So news agencies strive to keep their news items as simple as possible.

In recent times, however, news items have been flooded with photographs and graphics, increasing their size and making them less comprehensible. For news agencies, this is a serious setback because it means less revenue. Readers also prefer news items that come with photos or graphs or other visual content. News agencies would do well to think twice before including such elements. The photos in news items do not always match the information that is being conveyed – which is another reason why news items often get a bad press – no one wants to look at an article and then realize it is badly written or badly Photoshopped.

Finally, the ease at which news items can be spread across the Internet has increased their desirability. News can reach readers in many places other than newspapers and news channels, such as blogs and chat rooms. Social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter, make it easier than ever for people to share news items with friends and family. In fact, social network users are now even more inclined to share news items with friends and family, rather than simply relying on newspapers and news channels for breaking news.

Now that readers want to know what is going on, newspapers and news agencies need to start working harder to provide quality news content. Readers are not going to be satisfied with fluffy and poorly written stories any more – they want news that is interesting, informative, and clearly articulated. The days of blind enthusiasm for fluffy and poorly written articles are over.